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together to stop us from becoming greece. >> yes. >> man up, barack obama. strong words. >> he has a chance to be an historic president. what makes us greece? it's not because the tax code is at 35% versus 39.6. what's going to make this country greece, like every other western nation, retiring at 10,000 a day in terms of baby boomer, three workers for every retiree, in 20 years we'll have two. medicare and social security are about $30 trillion underfunded. if you did what tip o'neill and ronald reagan chose to do, reform entitlements, we become the most dominant place on the planet pretty quickly. so what i would plead with the president to do is use this mandate. redo revenue, which we should. but what keeps us from becoming the country we want to be and damns the future generations is entitlement and spending. when i was 21, my mom died, when i was 22 my dad died. if it wasn't for social security survivor benefits, my sister would have never gone to college. social security is going to fail. when i was 22 we needed the 300 and something bucks we got a month. i'm 57, i have no kids, i co
♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ imus in the morning ♪ >> you won't believe how bad things are in greece, but believe this, they are getting their bailout money. it came through today. good morning, everyone, 50 billion dollars flowing into greece. it will never be repaid. new figures show the country in a deep depression. 11 million people owe a half trillion dollars. back home, speaker boehner and president obama are a little closer to a deal and both have given some ground on taxes and spending. the markets like it. right now john boehner is trying to sell it to his party. across the country, record gun sales over the weekend. "varney & company" about to begin. i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time r christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. >> we have breaking news right now on the debate within the republican party about the fiscal cliff deal. rich edson has what, what is being discussed here, what is the latest, rich? >> a plan b on
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
at greece, greece has been very adept at increasing their debt ceiling. now they have 25% unemployment. there are people who can't even finds jobs in cities are having to move out according to press reports to rural areas. that could be our future. as tom said, if you gave the president every job forming tax increase that he's asked for, it's about 3% of the spending. and the president himself has said that the drivers of our debt are medicare, medicaid and health care. nothing else comes close. >> congresswoman stabenow pointed out -- >> you have to deal with the structural reforms to our entitlement spending. protecting current seniors but helping to insure my 10-year-old daughter and 9-year-old son that these programs are around for them. >> medicare savings, lot of republicans not you but a lot of republicans in the last campaign including mitt romney ran against. >> well, george, first of all, the $700 billion in savings doesn't save the government a penny, it takes that and spends it on other people. what -- it's really important that people look. the government is twice the size
of greece. greece is getting bailed out. and going on back and forth. will there be a deal by december 31st? i don't think so, but if a deal gets penned out by mid-january, we can look forward to focusing on earnings and get this fiscal cliff over with so we can see what's going on important in the world, and that's earnings. >> let me -- can i comment on that? >> yeah, sure. >> i want to comment on rick santelli's optimistic view that maybe there really is a deal in the offing. he has a point, you know. it's not over, you know, until it's over and these guys do sometimes come up with last-minute deals, but i want to be very clear. in order for that to happen john boehner basically has to agree that he's going to get a deal out of house with majority democrat votes, and i don't see why he does that before january 3rd. >> you're assuming the president has all the leverage, and i think the president would have a horrible legacy starting out with such turmoil, so i disagree. i think there's movement on the white house side on entitlements. >> rick, you do have to accept the fact that john boeh
to greece, the goal gets worse once we kick the can away. that will be the overriding probleming not the slowing economy not people spending money, but sure, that might not happen in the first two months, but it will eventually happen if we keep kicking down the can. we want to prove to the world that we have a solution and if it takes a few months to get there and higher taxes for a while, big deal, we will get there. that's got to be the plan not just the same nonsense. >> yeah, but larry, that's part of your point, but jonas says we're not in a bad recession, we're certainly not in a good recovery. and if we just keep falling little bit by little bit, maybe as much as jump off the cliff, but it's certainly a slippery slope. >> brenda, the damage is already being done. we saw it in november retail sales and companies delaying activity already and we know the ratings agencies are minutes away, we're right to fix the problem in the long run than making a bandaid short-term deal. it doesn't get recovery. >> we're going to get a bandaid deal and that's the only political way to do
rather than contraction. it's been since october of last year. also abroad greece announcing it will buy back bonds through a dutch auction. the set up whether allow athenss to assess the level of demand before setting a final bryce for the deal. part of the country's efforts to cut its about a along debt. and in germany, merkel is not ruling out the possibility of notifying greece some of its debt once athens finances are in better shape. angela merkel told a german tabloid that the question of the so-called haircut can be revisited. in the past, merkel's government had ruled out forgiving any debt. >> in corporate new, ubs is reportedly close to a settlement. the "new york times" says the swiss bank is expected to pay horn $450 million over claims that some of its employees submitted false libor rates. that's pretty huge story and we will take a look and ten to see what happens with this. also morgan stanley trader is under investigation by cme regulators over trades and treasury futures four years ago. at the time he was employed by goldman sachs. he's now head of global interest rate
they agreed to give greece now within days 34 billion euros. they've done a deal where the ecb will regulate the biggest banks in europe and, importantly, the germans will be exempted, state run banks, savings banks. so the skeletons can stay in the german closet there as far as the banks are concerned. that was important for the germans. it is ironic in a year when so many people called for a breakup the european union this summit, poland actually said we'd like to start off applications to become the 18th member of the eurozone. that will play out during the course of next year. as far as the stock markets are concerned, today is relatively flat overall. no follow through from china which i mentioned earlier. i thought it was very interesting. here you go. >> the european markets are closing now. >> some are red. some are green. if you check the data you'll see we haven't really moved at all today. china was up 4%. shanghai was up 4% overnight. normally you would expect the australian miners, global miners listed in london to bounce on that. they didn't very much today. and that is partly
seem like an emerging market economy here. >> are we greece? >> our politics are becoming as dysfunctional as greece. i mean, we're not greece, but if you look at what businessmen say about why they're not investing in the u.s., they will often give dysfunctional politics in washington as the top answer. it's not even tax rates that people are concerned about. it's just getting a deal, getting people aligned. >> we're going to roll some tape, but i just wanted to ask you quickly, last week your sort of advice to republicans was don't cave, compromise. >> right. >> so this week, given what we've seen so far, we see these one-on-one negotiations taking place, what do you think the best strategy on the part of the republicans is? >> don't cave. compromise. you're not going to get 35%. you're just not going to. you're not going to. the economy will go up in flames. you're just not going to get 35%. the president needs to understand he's not going to get 39.6%. if i were sitting in the house and the president asked me to go four, five percentage points up on tax rates right now
. >> did you see the s&p upgraded greece today by six notches? i had to hit the machine to make sure that was the correct number there. >> well, you know, a lot of volatility in rate. >> bob pisani, what do you think today? a pretty good real under way? all about the fiscal cliff? >> well, the markets, is bullish because the markets are acting like 2013 will resolve a lot of problems so we've multi-month highs in the stock market. we have the safe haven, gold and bonds just getting hit badly again. i mean, bond yields are moving up. gold is moving down on a day when the dollar is -- is weak today, so the markets are sort of acting like things are actually going to resolve themself. even now, maria, you might notice, the headlines out this afternoon aren't bullish. markets believe a deal is coming quickly. >> so do you guys. you don't have any necessarily different guidance or expectation or reports than we do, and you both are very much in step that a deal gets done what. if it doesn't? >> i kind of think what's going on right now is a little dance. everybody has to appeal to their c
. there are solutions to this. this is not europe. this is not greece. there are solutions. it's the politics that mess everything up. >> yeah. you're absolutely right. getting back to the issue of tax rates, it looked like we were getting closer. boehner offered to raise mate raitts for those making more than a million dollars a year, and the rate would only increase on the amount of money you earn over a million dollars a year. just raising those rates were a major concession for any republican. president obama, who insists on letting the bush tax cults expire for earns making more than $250,000, or at least that's how he presented it during the campaign, offered to let those taxes rise on those making more than $400,000 a year. we're talking marginal rates then so, that would be only on income above $400,000. by the way, mark, $370,000 a year is what puts you into the top 1% here. you're an economist. all those income levels, 250, 400, a million, flying around for raising rates, what in your opinion is the breakoff point at which raising rates would substantially hurt the economy? >> well, i mean, i
towards greece and european decline. we all know and both parties recognize a resolution to medicare liabilities has to be part of a solution. >> give me one idea you would be ready to sign onto today that would significantly reduce medicare spending. >> we've already passed such a solution in the house. last year we passed legislation that would reform medicare. the budget paul ryan, chairman of the budget committee put forward, passed it to the house, senate hasn't passed a bunl in 1,000 days. we weren't able to get them engaged on that topic. that proposal able to bend the cost curve in medicare, put us toward the budget and preserve medicare exactly the way it is for current retirees. that's the balance you have to strike. that legislation struck a balance of 55 and above keeping medicare exactly the way it is and making changes for those in their 20s and 30s and 40s. most people i talk to in those groups understand we've got to reform medicare to save it and balance the federal budget. >> congressman, good luck to you. hopefully we'll see you on the other side of a deal. sue. >>
is the ism number weakened the market baltimore than the fiscal cliff propped up by greece. tech has not had a very good run recently. up today, dell got an upgrade at goldman. sharon talked about gold. it may be that gold has not done too bad this year but gold stocks are not outperforming. again today they are on the downside. this has been a year of buying gold, not so much buying gold stocks. really, you go back to 2004 when you could buy the gld for the first time, then you could suddenly have an alternative to owning gold stocks. before that, that was the only way you got the gold. >>> to the nasdaq now. seema mody is there folth big movers. >> we're flat on the day. one unusual mover, deckers outdoor is the maker of ugg boots. stern upgrading from buy to neutral citing new product offerings could help the company next year. the stock up 8%. apple also a bit higher by .6%. the company announced this morning thatle iphone phone will be available in south korea on december 7th with more than 50 additional countries being added in december including brazil, russia and taiwan. trying to ca
. greece and spain. liz: jeff looks like he's about to damage you. go ahead, jeff. >> are well, you know, they're going to make a deal in washington. i lived inside the beltway, have a pretty good network inside the beltway. cantor is worried -- excuse me, not cantor, boehner is worried about not being reelected as speaker of the house. they can't vote on that until january 4th with the new congress on that. cantor wants that job. so i think boehner's going to press for a deal, i think he's going to go ahead and allow president obama to raise taxes to 39.6%, and i think that'll take the edge off the fiscal cliff. david: let's take this discussion out of the beltway and into the real world. the economy, and, jeff, i want to start with you because you're bullish, but if you're so bullish, hy are you downgrading housing right now? >> because our housing team made a really good call on the housing stocks, and they outran their valuations on a short to intermediate-term basis. they downgraded them about two months ago. liz: okay, so where's the money? show it to us. >> i like just about ever
it in france. they just did it in spain. they just did it in the u.k. >> they did it in greece. they raised the added-value tax four times. it's devastating consumer spending, and we're heading down the same road. david: larry mcdonald, new edge senior director. good to see you. thanks for coming in, appreciate it. sandy? >> ford recalling nearly 90,000 vehicles. did your car make the list? we've got the details coming up. >>> plus, the chances of falling off the fiscal cliff, it's not stopping one top money manager from buying. bob doll, he sells us where he's putting his money to work now. that's next. there is no mass-produced human. every humabeing is unique. and ther one store that recognizes it. the sleep number store. the only place in the world u'll find the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totally individualize your sleep. perfectly comfortable pillows that adjust to your size and shape. dual warmth comforters. all designed around the sleep number bed: a bed with dual-air technology that allows you adjust to the suppo
it was dubai and bp oil spill or greece or spain or the deleveraging or foreclosures. any of these things that we're supposed to take us out and yet we keep moving. i think the fiscal cliff is another one of these. >> let me ask you about the timing then. deutsche bank had a note out yesterday where they suggested that central banks have bought us a six months of time on the markets. if pmis do not improve, will we see growth? what would you say to that view? >> i mean, i'm pretty simple on this. i do not believe and we could debate this probably all day that quantitative easing itself has helped the economy at all. banks put that money right back to the fed as excess reserves. it hasn't boosted money in the economy. i don't believe that we've seen a false rally or sugar high. i think the growth in the economy and growth in the markets has been driven by productivity and profits. i think it's real. it's slow. it's real. we're going to have a weak fourth quarter. i believe most of that weakness is because of sandy. we're going to pick up later in the quarter. we'll have 2.5% to 3% growth n
. that something has to be growth and i still don't see how europe has a plan for more growth. >> we know greece is done with because they've already restructured their debt and what they did in the last two weeks, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval
indebted developed country in the world. much worse than even greece. then look at demographics, a little known program that haunts japan, they are having ever fewer babies. they don't want mass immigration to top a falling population and they are living a whole lot longer. so they have a lot of seniors and a tiny up and coming generation. japan has the most extreme demographics in recorded human history. what are they doing b a it? -- about it? not much you can do to persuade liberated japanese women to have more children with very traditional japanese men. that's a huge problem. demographics, like a super tanker, it takes a long time to turn it around. but japan has just elected a new government which promises to get the country out of its 20 year malaise. how is it going to do that? the new prime minister wants to print a ton of money and huge stimulus plan building yet more infrastructure. does that ring a bell? have we seen something like that here? it really can be useful, you know, to look over there. it might show us over here where we might be going. not good. [ male announcer ]
repaired, if you will, greece, now. we don't have to worry about europe at least until the second half of the year. we have stability in china because of economic activity and that was a drag and then we have the doj promising tease and the federal reserve doing the same thing and all of a sudden it is not the world looking over the cliff, but we 3-quarters of the world looking the other way starting to come back and that is the difference. tracy: what happens? we are stealing from queue to. >> we always steal from one quarter to another. tracy: europe might come back to bother us again the second half of the year. could that mean an okay first half, second half disaster's again? >> we never have smooth sailing at anything. sell in may and go away. which works sometimes and doesn't work. what we feel good about is investors are forced with a problem that dividend taxes are going to go up. to me that is a good problem because it is going to take investors out of the safety of the blue chips and staples and utilities and put them into faster growth equities. riskier. if we look at the ri
seven early movers for you, high profits, but less money coming in in the packaging company, greece it's called. what's with the stock? it's up about 4%. the rare earth mining company molycorp ousted its chief executive officer. it's down a little. profits disappointing seismic equipment maker geospace, down and dupont buying back a billion dollars worth of its stock and it's up just a little. health insurer aetna expects higher profits next year, it's up. and microsoft has wrapped up production of its new surface tablet and it, too, moving higher in the early going, i own some microsoft stock. netflix says it needs many more subscribers to be profitable. nonetheless it's up. dow industrials are up 37. and news from berkshire hathaway coming in and it's-- okay, they've bought back 9200 of their class a shares from the estate of one of their shareholders. so they bought back 9200 shares there, the class a stock. that was the news, part of the news on which the halting of berkshire hathaway was based. okay? when they start trading again, nell pretty soon, we'll get a quote for you on tha
borrow any more money until we fix this country from becoming greece, and that requires significant entitlement reform. >> reporter: for the record, senator graham is not one of those who favors increasing tax rates on the wealthy. he favors more revenue from them by capping deductions. cheryl and dennis. dennis: thanks very much, peter barnes. and our next guest says many republicans in private are conceding they may have to give president obama much of what he wants. we are joined by potomac research group political strategist, greg vallier. so do you think president obama will win a twofer; higher tax rates on the rich and deduction caps to get the rich to pay more as well? >> maybe. it's moving in that direction. i think peter barnes in the previous piece got it exactly right. i think the republicans in private, dennis, are beginning to say let's cut a deal on this, we'll come back and fight again when we really do have leverage. that's on the debt ceiling fight in february. dennis: how can voters have any faith that if they do tax hikes now and wait for spending cuts later they
there are two that we're watching for american investors. one is greece, one is italy. the developments today are both good from an american investing perspective because they keep a lid on what's happening in those two respects. in greece there was trouble on the streets of athens last night as a result of left-wing protesters and students out and police using tear gas to disperse them as they protested the death of a teenager as a result of a police shooting four years ago, but the more important thing from a market perspective is that in 30 minutes' time now, the book will close on the greek debt buyback. now, remember what's happening here. the greek government is borrowing 10 billion euros from the rest of europe to buy back its own debt at a discount. if it does that successfully, by midday our time when that book closes, then more cash will flow through from the rest of europe, possibly next week it will be able to repay its bills and capitalize on the banks. let's check the close. >> the european markets are closing now. >> so we kind of went nowhere today. a lot of these markets in e
than greece, more than spain. but conversely, china, if gdp is coming back, they are in what many consider to be a sweet spot. >> the numbers came out saturday for china. i think italy has been remarkably good. so this was a big game changer. italy had been a part of the good story of european recovery. now it's back. >> all to monti was never intended to be there for the long term. >> sure. >> in fact, he may be leaving a month earlier than originally planned. this should not be a surprise in the larger context. while we may mention berlusconi's name right now, he's not expected to win. >> look, we knew that monti was successful. >> it may be whoever follows him is going to roll some of the gains that he's had. so-called gains. >> that's going to cause ripples here. look, on saturday night, i said, we're going to have a nice opening. china's good, people know that monti is not really going to hurt italy. i think if china continues the momentum, but the number -- >> the ex sports were less than expected in the month of november. which is a concern. then there's this perverse glass
. this morning, they agreed finally on the disbursement of aid to greece. some says it removed uncertainty. other investors, not so sure. i wanted to show you the italian curve, italy and spanl wrapping up their fund-raising for the year. their auctions weren't all of that huge, but we are seeing yields fall, prices rise across the board as investors did show up. if we flip over to spain in particular, we can take a look at the three-year over here. a bid to cover ratio of 4.8%. one indication certainly of the kind of indications there are where the ecb is expected to be the most active if and when these countries have to access their bailout programs. now we're seeing prices in spain sell off a little bit. the ten-year, just under 5.4% is the level there. for the longer dated papers, investors are a little bit more wary. now, that news coming out of the euro group meeting, i wanted to show you the euro/dollar as we wrap up today's global market support. it's still down .1%, 1.3056. that would tell you that the resolution is largely priced in. now as focus moves into the start of next year, a cou
of greece. we saw these up in the range of better than 8% earlier. now in the range of 5% to 8%. again, if you look at the levels, you see we're snapping up from low valuations generally speaking. it doesn't take a lot at 63 cents to get an 8% move. >>> quick look over here if you want to take a shot of the wall behind me. it is green for the most part. and greece's borse is one adding 2% today. we're seeing that reflected across the bond space. portugal for example seeing ten-year yields falling. same for spain and italy. the boreses and footy 100, the xetra dax, this has been the outperformer up in the range of 30%. another .3% after the ifo out of germany. came in better than expected. again, a good sign for growth. not necessarily, though, for those who would like to see a weaker europe. the ibex 35 adding 1.3%. and the nikkei, as you mentioned, up above 10,000 for the first time in eight months. adding 2.4%. better hope the moves in the japanese government or bank of japan pan out. we'll get the bank of japan's decision tomorrow. but this comes on the day when, remember, it's on t
legislator of athens in ancient greece. and he replaced the prevailing system at the time of oral, law and blood feud by a written code of rules that could only be enforced by a court. the first court system. so the rules, because they were written, were hard to get around so they were draconian rules, which is where draconian -- draco. >> wasn't he in harry potter, too? >> he was also in harry potter. i don't know.was he? >> i think he was the bad kid growing up. >> and, anyway, with that out of the way and the world hurdling to an end tomorrow, still to come, if you want to know whether or not you should be optimistic about a fiscal cliff deal -- >> oh, draco malfoy. >> oh, yeah, the young bad kid? >> the blond kid. >> he was so good he was bad. check out the markets on any given day and we're going to do just that. tell what's happening with the fiscal cliff. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and
we get to 2020, we're going to be in the shape greece is in with 152% of our gdp being locked into debt. we cannot sustain this. you have to begin to make some systematic across the board and detailed reductions in this spending discretionary and on the entitlement and you have to deal with the trust funds and treat them as trust funds, not as pass-throughs to the general fund. >> congresswoman, thank you very much. i know it's a busy day. >> it is. thank you. >> congresswoman blackburn. >>> steve liesman is working on this since late last night. at the very least, steve, it's high theater, wouldn't you agree? >> high theater and complex math, carl. what we want to do is concentrate on what i market really cares about. how far apart are the sides? unfortunately, it is so complicated we can only do one piece at a time. so we're only in this presentation going to talk about revenue, not spending. and i have to say, these are the best available numbers? are they the actual numbers? we have only run them by each side and they have said that they are not far off or as close as you
greece they are not a monolithing society. for some people that would be totally impossible to utter a word or a sound. for other people it's cathartic to open up and express their love and devotion and to have the final words over someone they love. i try very much as a pastor not to among their relationships and emotions and how they use to commemorate the person they leaply will have. >> as a reporter i like to get as many information as you can. i want to know every detail about everything and that's a way of processing it, managing it. people must ask you questions you cannot answer. and they say where was god when this happened? >> it's precisely as you is asaid i've tried to avoid answers goesable temporary. there are some things that are handeds now life that we do not know or understand. these areas, ambiguous areas where we don't have a deficit answer it's better not to give any answer at all than to give one inappropriate. that's why we have faith for those things we cannot explain and point to directly, we have to frtrust god and lean on him get through the sufficient tim
is considered crucial for greece's efforts to resolve the financial problem. >>> and the european union has fined tv and computer monitor makers about $2 billion saying those companies fixed monitor tube prices for a decade which ended in 2006 talking about companies like philips, lg, and panasonic among the companies fined. philips, which was assessed the biggest chunk of the penalty says it will appeal the ruling. >>> and mortgage applications rose 4.5% last week according to new figures from the mortgage bankers association. most of the increase was accounted for by a rise in refinancing activity. >>> all right. the dollar hitting a six-week low on uncertainty about whether a budget deal would be reached. meantime, oil continues to trade below $90 a barrel. joining us this morning, chief market strategist at worldwide markets. also kevin book who is managing director at clear view energy partners. and joe, let's start off talking about the dollar. i can't make heads or tails of why the dollar is under so much pressure. i know things are bad here, we're worried about the fiscal cliff. but
% the last month. the eu finance ministers' plan to give money to greece, will the rally continue? todd gordon is with us aspen trading you. morning to you, todd. >> hey, simon. >> we have failed twice to get through 1.31 on the euro. where do we go from here? >> the fourth time we tried? the euro support and european finance ministers rather busy, appoint the ecb to head up a eu banking regulation which unfortunately you won't take effect until march 2014. the meantime we need to rely on esm for support. the other side, german finance minister wrote off the lower bank, congress that they approve a greek aid bailout. looks to be euro fairly support. >> interesting you argue that. in is the point here that the fed is accelerating on debasing you the dollars, that is why the euro rises? >> really interesting. that was the trade yesterday. the take away from the fed's statement. we reached a new high in qe 4, 85 billion a month, purchased and treasuries and mds that put the dollar to heel. overnight, reaction to the fed, overnight you can the dollar stayed very offered and i think despite
a year. the equivalent of about $55,000. the current top tax rate in greece is 45% for those earning more than 100,000 euros. finally, business sentiment in europe is slumping in part due to economic uncertainty ahead of this weekend's election. the bank of japan sentiment index dropping to minus 12 from minus 3 in the prior quarter. that was a bigger drop than economists were expecting. mr. kernen? >> all right. getting all these things. so you like he's like bloomberg? no 16 ounce -- >> guy runs -- >> you know. >> no 16 ounce anything over that in sugared drinks. comments, questions about anything you see here on "squawk," e-mail us at squawk @c in.com. you can also follow us on twitter @squawkcnbc. still to come this morning, john mcafee. in the flesh. well he won't be here but on camera. in his first interview since arriving back in the states. an interview you've got to see. plus. have you seen these? want to know how to use them? one of the new ways retailers are hoping to win over consumers. we're going to explain qr codes. the bar code guy died yesterday. can i help you? i heard y
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